Member Update

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OAN arranges computer offer, training to assist with transition

As you know by now, the OAN is transitioning to using electronic means to communicate with members. We realize this may prove challenging to some grower members who have yet to acquire a computer. To help in the transition to the e-communications world, the OAN has partnered with two Portland companies, DP Northwest and New Horizons Computer Learning Centers, to offer a special program to OAN members who want a computer for their business and/or would like computer training.

The program consists of special offers to purchase a starter PC, purchase some basic business software, get assistance with connecting to the Internet and provide an opportunity for classroom training in basic computer operations and electronic communications. For details, download the flier. Please note: This is a limited-time offer -- responses must be received no later than Dec. 20 to be eligible for this offer.

December 2005

In this Issue:

Transportation update

Progress continues on program

Regulatory update

P. ramorum-related regulations hot topic at regional meeting

Small growers to meet

Marketing is Jan. 26 topic

Landscaping adds value

Study puts numbers to addage

Raising a stink

Keep eye out for new bug


Yard, Garden & Patio Show is Feb. 24-26

Check out www.ygpshow.com for complete details about the 2006 Yard, Garden & Patio Show.

USDA funding

Informational meetings set for value-added grants, energy programs

College horticulture
classes listed

Check out the OAN Web site for complete listings of university and community college horticulture programs and class schedules. Under the Nursery Industry Career Center link, click on “College & University Programs.”

East-side opportunity

Redmond to host High Desert Green Industry Conference

Attention, students

Deadline to apply for ONF scholarships is April 3, 2006

DECEMBER HOLIDAY EVENTS

12/06:
Clackamas Chapter

12/07:
Emerald Empire Chapter

12/07:
Mt. Hood Chapter

12/08:
Central Oregon Chapter

12/13:
Willamette Chapter

Please note: the OAN office will be closed Dec. 23 and 26 for the Christmas holiday.

 » For more events, see our online calendar.

It's all online

EPA electronic dockets move to new federal comment system

New hire

Jeff Stone is new government relations director for OAN

Trees for Troops

1,200 Christmas trees delivered to Fort Hood, Texas.

Helping the needy

Plant a Row for the Hungry does well in Oregon this year

 

THIS MONTH'S FLIERS:

Important Information:
Monthly Member Update Electronic-Only as of January 2006


Download (PDF)



OAN Electronic Communications Offer


Download (PDF)



Northwest Ag Show
Seminar Series


Download (PDF)



Problems downloading?

Transportation update

Progress continues on program

The OAN continues to work on developing a transportation program to provide greater certainty of truck availability at competitive rates. The essential element of the proposed program is to aggregate and organize industry demand for freight and to seek bids from regional and national carriers for the business. By doing so, the program will expand the number of carriers serving the nursery industry. Consultants working for the OAN believe the industry can achieve significant savings and improve overall carrier performance in the areas of timely pick-up, delivery, dispute resolution, credit terms, etc.

The OAN is working toward the goal of developing a modest transportation program for later in the 2006 shipping season, but the full benefit of the association’s initiative won’t be available for nursery shippers until 2007. However, the OAN would like to provide a robust transportation benefit for its Christmas tree grower members in 2006. The OAN is nearing completion of a business plan, a 2006 annual operating plan and other elements of the project so as to qualify for $600,000 in state funding.

For additional information on the project, you can contact OAN President Pete Brentano of Brentano's Tree Farm or executive director John Aguirre.

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Regulatory update

P. ramorum-related regulations hot topic at regional meeting

Industry officials and regulatory officials from California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, joined by representatives from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture met in Seattle last month to discuss nursery industry regulatory issues. Discussion at the meeting centered on Phytophthora ramorum and the use of integrated systems of nursery production as the basis for a new approach to nursery industry regulation. Regulatory officials indicated that current regulatory programs appeared to be working to limit shipments of P. ramorum infected plant material from states where a federal regulatory order is currently in effect. Some concerns were raised regarding the effectiveness of the USDA’s “confirmed nursery protocol” to fully eradicate P. ramorum from infected nurseries. However, results seemed to vary from California, Oregon and Washington. Oregon Department of Agriculture officials were very confident that the likelihood of re-infection at a nursery was very low. Regulatory officials and industry representatives participating in the meeting believe that 2006 would see continued improvements in detection, control and eradication efforts, making less likely any reoccurrence of significant quantities of infected nursery stock leaving California, Oregon and Washington.

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Obituary

In MemoryLongtime nurseryman Duane Sherwood dies at age 74

A service will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2005, in Willamette National Cemetery for Duane Andrew Sherwood, who died Dec. 1, 2005. He was 74.

Sherwood was a longtime nurseryman who had much involvement with the Oregon nursery industry in its infancy, including helping found the Farwest Show. He was still active in the OAN, serving on its Marketing Committee and as a board member of the Mt. Hood Chapter.

Sherwood was born Aug. 16, 1932, in Portland. He graduated from Washington High School and Oregon State College. He served in the Army in the Korean War. He began his own business, Plants Unlimited, in Boring, Ore., in 1973. He was a cofounder of the Farwest Show, the Portland industry trade show that is one of the leading shows of its type in the nation. In 1951, he married Barbara Fearn.

Survivors include his wife; sons, Kenneth and Daniel; brother, Roger; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Remembrances can be made to the Casey Eye Clinic in care of the Gresham Elks Lodge. Arrangements by American Burial.

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Small growers to meet

Marketing is Jan. 26 topic

The Small Nurseries Group (a group of OAN Category 6 members) will meet from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 26, at the OAN office. In addition to the all-important networking, the general topic for the meeting will be “Marketing to Buyers: Taking It to the Next Step.” To RSVP and for more information about the meeting, please contact Dave Leckey of Oregon Small Trees at leckeyd@gervais.com or (503) 625-9467.

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Landscaping adds value

Study puts numbers to addage

“From a consumer’s perspective, a good landscape can improve perceived home value by 12 percent"

Michigan State University research provides perspective on which landscape attributes people value most. Landscape design sophistication was the most important factor, followed by plant size and plant type. The study indicates that landscapers should indicate the types of plants used in a design, but realize that potential clients will not likely value this as much as design sophistication and plant size. “From a consumer’s perspective, a good landscape can improve perceived home value by 12 percent,” said MSU professor Bridget Behe. “What we see in design sophistication is that a curved bed costs about the same as a straight line bed to install, but can enhance home value by 1 percent to 2 percent by itself. Simply curving bed lines could add $2,500 to $5,000 to the perceived value of a $250,000 home.”

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Raising a stink

Keep eye out for new bug

More information about Halyomorpha halys

Visit ODA's Web site for pictures and a complete description of the pest.

Make reports to the Oregon Invasive Species Hotline:
1-866-INVADER

As colder weather drives certain insects indoors, the Oregon Department of Agriculture is asking the public to help detect the presence of the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys. The stink bug is a potentially serious pest of agriculture and can be an uninvited house guest in large numbers.

Last year, Oregon became the first state west of the Mississippi River to report the presence of the brown marmorated stink bug. In all, dozens of the exotic pest were detected — many reported to ODA by Oregonians following a highly publicized pest alert. Based on these reports, an established population of brown marmorated stink bugs was confirmed by ODA and USDA’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service in the Ladd’s Addition neighborhood of southeast Portland. The presence of the insect has since been confirmed in other parts of Portland and could have possibly spread throughout the Willamette Valley and other parts of Oregon.

The brown marmorated stink bug is native to Japan, China, Taiwan and Korea. It was first found in the United States in 2001 and, until the summer of 2004, was confined to a handful of East Coast states, including Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and West Virginia. While similar in looks to Oregon’s native stink bugs, the brown marmorated species could be especially troubling to the state because it has no natural predators, parasites or diseases to help control its population.

Like several other insects in Oregon — including box elder bugs and Asian multicolored lady beetles — the brown marmorated stink bug likes to seek shelter in homes during the fall and winter months. Where the bug has become established, it can enter homes by the thousands, which can be stressful and disturbing to residents. These bugs are harmless to people, although as the name suggests, they can release an unpleasant odor when disturbed.

In an agricultural setting, the insect has a wide appetite for many crops and could be especially troubling to the tree fruit industry.

Once again, ODA is enlisting the public’s help in finding additional brown marmorated stink bugs. A Web site containing pictures and a complete description of the pest can be found at http://oregon.gov/ODA/PLANT/alerts_index.shtml or the public can report to the Oregon Invasive Species Hotline at 1-866-INVADER. In order to confirm a report, ODA requires a specimen. Details on preserving and sending suspect insects can be obtained by contacting the hotline.

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The garden is open

Oregon Garden remains open through fall and winter months

The board and staff of the Oregon Garden want you to spread the word far and wide that the garden is open from now through April 2006 every day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. except for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. General admission is $5 for adults, or $4 for students ages 8 through 17 and for seniors 60 or older. Admission is free for children age 7 and younger and Oregon Garden members. The Gordon House, the Garden Café and the Garden Gift Shop, a unique place for holiday shopping, are also open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Reservations may be made by calling (503) 874-6006 for tours of The Gordon House and for specialty teas taking place in the Frank Lloyd Wright home on Saturdays in December.

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USDA funding

Informational meetings set for value-added grants, energy programs

Meeting Dates & Times

Tuesday, Dec. 20
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Columbia Gorge Discovery Center
The Dalles

Wednesday, Dec. 21
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
USDA Service Center
Redmond

Thursday, Dec. 22
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Four Rivers Cultural Center
Ontario

Oregon’s Rural Business-Cooperative Service Director Jeff Deiss announced dates for information meetings regarding the 2006 Notices of Funding Availability for the Value Added Producer Grant and Renewable Energy Systems & Energy Efficiency Improvements Grant programs.

These programs are for agricultural producers and small rural businesses interested in entering new areas or improving on existing operations. The informational meetings are designed to provide introductory information. USDA business staff will be available to discuss individual projects in more detail. In addition, staff will be available to work with applicants prior to submittal of proposals. For additional information, contact Don Hollis at (541) 278-8049 ext. 129 or don.hollis@or.usda.gov; or Martin Zone at (503) 414-3361 or martin.zone@or.usda.gov.

Agricultural producers and small rural business representatives who are interested in applying for either or both grants may attend any of the following meetings: Tuesday, Dec. 20, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Dr., The Dalles; Wednesday, Dec. 21, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., USDA Service Center, 625 S.E. Salmon Ave., Redmond; Thursday, Dec. 22, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Four Rivers Cultural Center, 676 S.W. 5th Ave., Ontario.

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WeedMapper

Project seeks data for 2006

Contact Information

Beth Myers-Shenai
Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program
635 Capitol St. N.E.
Salem, OR, 97301
(503) 986-4621
smyers@oda.state.or.us

www.weedmapper.org

The WeedMapper project is now accepting noxious weed distribution data to include in the 2006 update of maps. What is needed is any location information that has been collected for Oregon state-listed noxious weeds. This includes updates from the 2005 field season for those who have already contributed data and all past and current data from new contributors.

The following information is required: exact weed location (lat/long or UTM coordinate), weed species name (common and scientific), contact person name, organization, address, phone and e-mail address. If providing an update, include if the data replaces earlier information supplied or if it is in addition to it.

The following information is also requested: number of plants (in quantity or acres), type of location (roadside, pasture, forest, field, urban or riparian), frequency (spot, patch or solid stand), treatment (manual/mechanical, chemical or none) and land ownership type (USFS, BLM, state, county, city, private, unknown or other).

Data needs to be in some type of electronic format. Small sets of data can be entered directly into the weed sighting report form at www.weedmapper.org. For larger data sets the following format is preferred: GIS Shapefile — one per weed species. They can be point, line or area files. Please include a note about what datum was used to collect the data (e.g., WGS 84, NAD 27) and what projection the shapefile is (e.g., Oregon Lambert, state/plane). Other electronic formats are also acceptable: Shapefiles with more than one weed species, arc coverages, spreadsheets or any other format that has the data stored electronically in table form.

Please send your information by Jan. 31, 2006, to have it included in the new 2006 update. Information in the preferred format will be given priority. For more information, contact Beth Myers-Shenai, Noxious Weed Management technician, Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program, 635 Capitol St. N.E. Salem, OR, 97301, (503) 986-4621 or smyers@oda.state.or.us. Please contact Myers-Shenai if you have data to share and she can arrange the best way to receive it from you.

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East-side opportunity

Redmond to host High Desert Green Industry Conference

Central Oregon will host the east side’s 14th annual High Desert Green Industry Conference Feb. 15-16, 2006, at the Deschutes Fair & Expo Center in Redmond.

An event for those who supply, design, maintain or manage landscapes, the conference promotes and fosters education and professional development to strengthen the green industry. The conference also includes a trade show with expanded space for exhibitors, along with credits for continuing education and pesticide recertification. Sponsorship opportunities are available at several different levels. To pledge your support to the conference, write to Teresa@Specialized-Events.com or call Gary English at Landsystems Nursery, (541) 382-7696 ext. 16.

The High Desert Green Industry Conference is sponsored by United Pipe & Supply and presented by Oregon Landscape Contractors Association, Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon State University Extension Service. For more information, visit http://extension.oregonstate.edu/Deschutes or call (541) 548-6088.

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Last chance

Entertainment BookEntertainment book sale ends Dec. 22; order today

Time is running out to purchase a 2006 Entertainment book. Filled with discounts on dining, shopping and attractions, the books make great holiday gifts. Plus, proceeds benefit the Oregon Nurseries Foundation, which provides scholarships to students pursuing careers in ornamental horticulture.

Order forms were included with last month’s Update, or you can purchase books via this link. You will also find the link on www.oan.org.

Note: if you order online, enter group account number 141300 when prompted.

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Attention, students

ONFDeadline to apply for ONF scholarships is April 3, 2006

Students pursuing a career in horticulture are encouraged to apply for an Oregon Nurseries Foundation scholarship. The awards are sponsored by individuals and OAN chapters as a way to support the next generation of green industry professionals.

For the first time, the application is available as an interactive PDF; students can fill out the form online and then print a copy to be included with the other required materials — no typewriters necessary! To access the form and to find out more about the awards, visit http://scholarship.oan.org.

Completed applications must be postmarked or delivered to the OAN office no later than April 3, 2006.

Questions? Call Heather Stanley at (503) 682-5089 or send an e-mail to hstanley@oan.org.

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Revised manual

2005 Worker Protection Standard How-to-Comply Manual available

More information

For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov.

The Environmental Protection Agency is releasing its revised 2005 Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides How-to-Comply Manual. This compliance assistance tool has been updated to reflect amendments to the Worker Protection Standard, a regulation designed to protect agricultural workers and pesticide handlers. The revised manual provides detailed information on who is covered by the WPS and how to meet regulatory requirements. The updated manual will facilitate better protection of pesticide workers and handlers in agriculture from the potential risks of pesticides.

The new manual supersedes the 1993 version. Changes to the WPS since 1993 have made the earlier version obsolete, and its continued use may lead an employer to be out of compliance. The 2005 manual revision was coordinated by EPA’s National Agricultural Compliance Assistance Center and a workgroup consisting of representatives from EPA headquarters, EPA regional offices and several state agencies, with input solicited from USDA and other state and tribal pesticide agencies.

For further information about the revised manual and how to obtain print and/or CD-ROM versions of the manual, or for additional information about the WPS, please visit http://www.epa.gov/agriculture/htc.html.

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It’s all online

EPA electronic dockets move to new federal comment system

Federal Docket Management System

http://www.regulations.gov

The Environmental Protection Agency’s electronic public docket and comment system, EDOCKET, is being replaced by an enhanced federal governmentwide electronic docket management and comment system. The Federal Docket Management System provides public access to federal regulatory information by providing a one-stop, Internet site for the public to search, view, download and submit comments on all federal rulemakings and selected non-rulemaking materials.

Go to http://www.regulations.gov to access EPA dockets. Using the “advanced docket search” option, first narrow your search by selecting “EPA” under the “Agency” field, and then you can locate the EPA docket using the Docket ID number identified in the relevant Federal Register document, as well as other key information. Follow the on-line instructions to access the docket, view documents in the docket and submit comments.

Links to EDOCKET from current Web pages are now being redirected to the new system.

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Pesticide applicators

Course program information available in online format

Course programs

Visit oregonipm.ippc.orst.edu for course programs and a complete catalog.

Exams & Testing Sites

Visit ODA's Web site or call the ODA Pesticides Division at (503) 986-4635.

The Oregon State University Extension Service annually offers training related to pest and pesticide management. The training courses permit pesticide applicators to earn credits towards pesticide license recertification, but their purpose is more than simply maintaining a license. As more is learned about pest and pesticide management, ways to utilize pesticides in a more responsible, effective and efficient manner are offered.

Visit http://oregonipm.ippc.orst.edu/PSEP%202006.pdf for course programs and a complete catalog. Recertification credit hours have not been confirmed by the Oregon Department of Agriculture in all cases. However, estimates should be close.

OSU Extension reminds users of the program that the Oregon Department of Agriculture is the institution granting a pesticide license. Since 1978, ODA has provided two methods by which pesticide applicators and consultants may become recertified: 1. successfully complete the required examination(s), or 2. attend short courses or other training programs approved by ODA for this purpose.

In order to become recertified by the credit hour accumulation method, an individual must accumulate a total of 40 credit hours during their five-year certification period. A maximum of 15 credit hours will be recognized in any one calendar year. If you have questions about recertification credits please call the ODA Pesticides Division at (503) 986-4635.

For greater clientele convenience, exams for pesticide applicators are now administered in most community colleges. For specific information on these testing sites, call the ODA Pesticides Division. Much of this information is available on ODA's Web site at: http://oregon.gov/ODA/PEST/. To reduce costs, a single registration form is provided in the online catalog. Course registration may vary, so please pay close attention to the instructions given in each course outline.

Suggestions and comments for improving the overall quality of these training programs should be directed to Tim Stock, IPPC/OSU, 2040 Cordley Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331-2915, (541) 737-6279 or (503) 737-3541.

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New hire

Jeff Stone is new government relations director for OAN

Jeff StoneThe OAN has selected Jeff Stone as the association's new Director of Government Relations.

Stone has extensive experience working on federal, state and local public policy issues, having spent 14 years working in local and federal government positions. He served eight years with Metro Regional Government in various senior level positions, including chief of staff. Prior to joining Metro, he worked as a staff assistant to Sen. Bob Packwood. Before joining the OAN, Stone was director of public relations for the advertising/public relations firm Capelli Miles.

During his long tenure with Metro, Stone managed the council’s policy processes, and he established a successful track record in negotiating public-private sector agreements. In addition, Stone’s experience with Metro means he brings to the OAN extensive expertise and knowledge of land use planning processes and policy at the local and state levels of government. At Miles Capelli, Stone solidified his credentials as a public relations strategist and as a highly effective spokesperson on behalf of clients.

“Stone will continue the professionalism in government relations established at the OAN by former Speaker of the House Mark Simmons,” said John Aguirre, OAN executive director.

Stone will join the OAN on Friday, Dec. 9.

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NW Ag ShowNW Ag Show

Don’t miss the OAN seminars

Look for the flier included with this Update for details about the 2005 Northwest Agricultural Show, specifically the OAN seminars to be held Feb. 1 and 2 in conjunction with the show. The show runs Jan. 31 through Feb. 2 at the Portland Expo Center. Seminars will be held at the Red Lion Vancouver at the Quay, just across the river.

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loading loose treesTrees for Troops

The OAN Clackamas Chapter delivered 1,200 Christmas trees to Fort Hood, Texas, to wish a happy holidays to families of soldiers serving in Iraq. This is the third year of the Trees for Troops project. For complete details and photos, visit the OAN home page and look under “What’s New.”




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Canby FFA update

awards
awards
awards

Four students place at nationals

Eleven of the Canby FFA members attended the National FFA Convention held Oct. 24-29 in Louisville, Ky. More than 53,000 members and guests were in attendance at the largest youth leadership conference in the nation.

While in Louisville, the team of Katherine Simnett and Nicole Lambert competed in the botany/agriscience competition. Their project titled “Out with the Old, In with the New” involved determining if the propagation time of the Cape Primrose could be decreased if they used tissue culture instead of a stem or leaf cutting.
The duo placed second in the nation in this division.

Jan Bierma and Branden Rabe competed in the biochemistry division of the agriscience competition. Their project titled “Does Temperature Matter in Oil Distillation” involved determining the optimum temperature for the condensation of the steam to collect oil from plant material. Bierma and Rabe also placed second in the nation in the division. All four students will be receiving a scholarship from the National FFA Foundation.

The theme of the National FFA Convention was “Living to Serve.” FFA members from Alaska to Puerto Rico and from Maine to Hawaii attended the convention. FFA members raised more than $500,000 to help the hurricane victims in the southern states. FFA members were able to hear Amanda Gore, Stedman Graham and Bill Irwin talk about challenges and obstacles that they have overcome and how FFA members can do the same to be active members in their communities.

Canby FFA members also attended workshops on how to become better leaders in their communities as well as college-entrance workshops. The FFA Career Show was home to more than 400 vendors during the convention. FFA members were able to meet and talk with companies like Monsanto, Case IH, Carhart and colleges from around the nation.

While the students were busy attending their workshops, FFA Adviser Terri Cummings was attending workshops that were curriculum based. “I am very proud of Katherine, Nicole, Jan and Branden,” Cummings said. “They have worked hard on these projects for the past year. Attending this convention was a great opportunity for all that attended.”

Canby FFA members attending the convention were Sarah Donaldson, Roy Hofer, Ryan Killgore, Sam Killgore, Bobby Meyer, Pieter Bierma and Richard Montecucco. Jerry and Rebecca Simnitt, Brian Field and Andrea Lambert were also in attendance.

awards


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Helping the needy

Plant a Row for the Hungry does well in Oregon this year

Plant a Row for the HungryCongratulations are in order for the impressive effort made by Oregon Plant a Row for the Hungry participants in 2005. This project was new for most of the businesses and groups responding. Oregon Association of Nurseries retail garden centers, Oregon Master Gardeners and others took the initiative to set up, advertise and facilitate collection of thousands of pounds of fresh garden produce. Donations were funneled to the state’s hungry through the state’s system of food banks.

The following is a summary of responses from Portland Nursery, Cornell Farm, Farmington Gardens, Valley View Nurseries, Al’s Garden Center, Territorial Seed Company, Nichols Garden Nursery, Fresh To You Produce & Garden Center, Tillamook Master Gardeners, Squirrel Heights Gardens — all retail garden centers who participated in the 2005 Plant a Row for the Hungry project.

In the Portland-metro area, Farmington Gardens and Cornell Farm reported consistent donations from July through mid-October. Together, these two collection sites donated almost 1,300 pounds of high-quality, fresh garden produce to Sunshine Pantry, which serves several hundred families every week. According to Farmington Gardens’ Linda Shively, “The Sunshine Pantry was thrilled with the quality of the produce — this was definitely not the ‘rejects’ they are used to receiving.”

Thanks to all who worked to make these incredible contributions to your communities.

Plant a Row for the Hungry works because people care to share.

Cornell Farm’s Deby Barnhart says the reaction of the project from her customers was telling. “Even those who didn't garden were very supportive and thankful,” Barnhart said. “I think it gave thought to the possibility of future gardening for the purpose of donating. We primarily had one person who had a very large garden bringing in produce, but as this was our first year, I think more people will decide to participate each year. We plan to do more exposure to our customers earlier to this program.”

Portland Nursery’s two locations worked directly with Oregon Food Bank, which collected produce as it was received. Apparently, the difference in promotion and visibility at the two stores made a big difference in the success of the project. Next year, both stores will follow the example established this year by the Division street’s effective displays, which were colorful and creative, complete with stuffed cloth vegetables and a checkered tablecloth. Stark Street’s Peggy Acott says of the Division store display, which was set up with the vegetable starts, “every single customer who bought vegetable starts must have gone away knowing about PAR.”

Squirrel Heights Gardens replaced plantings of flowers with rows of crops to donate to nearby FISH Emergency Services in southeast Portland. Co-owner Betty Berdan kept very detailed records of the donations from her garden, including lettuce: 127 heads (grown from the seed donated by Territorial seeds); pea pods: 14.5 pounds; Swiss chard: 31.5 pounds; green beans: 22 pounds; cucumbers: 7 pounds; carrots: 27 pounds (from seed from PAR); beets: 10 pounds; tomatoes: 5 pounds (hit by a blight); corn: 5 pounds; acorn squash: 18 pounds; butternut squash: 22 pounds; kohlrabi: 4 pounds; potatoes: 5 pounds; and onions: 2 pounds. That’s 283 pounds of produce donated from one garden!

Several mid-valley sites actively promoted PAR. Nichols Garden Nursery not only collected several hundred pounds of produce on site that went to Linn-Benton Food Share, but the retailer included free packets of seeds explaining PAR in mail orders to customers across the nation. Al’s Garden Centers added a canned food collection this year and took in 1,548 pounds of food for the Oregon Food Bank. Fresh To You Produce & Garden Center estimates that, with the help of its customers, it donated about 50 pounds per week to the Stayton Community Food Bank. Co-owner Nancy Hendricks says, “We will definitely continue with PAR. We believe in aiding the hunger relief efforts.” On the coast, Tillamook Master Gardeners sponsored an effort that resulted in the donation of about 450 pounds of produce to the CARE program in Tillamook.

In southern Oregon, Territorial Seed Company donated food from customers to Community Sharing, and Valley View Nursery reports great success. Patricia Carbone wrote this detailed explanation of Valley View’s first year efforts: “We partnered with Access Inc., a non-profit agency that helps the needy in our community. They were able to pick up any day of the week since they drove past us daily for food pickups at the restaurants in Ashland. As a result, we were able to accept donations every day. We planted a demo garden complete with PAR signage. We were able to harvest and donate about 250 pounds of vegetables. Total donations to Access were 645 pounds!

“We had PAR displays at the spring and fall Jackson County home shows, the Jackson County Master Gardener Spring Fair and Master Gardener Fall Gardening Symposium. I did an interview about PAR on a local radio show. I did a TV spot with Access in the spring explaining PAR and how the community could get involved. We did a TV feature story on Feed the Hungry Day in October. They remembered our participation in PAR and wanted an update on the success of the program. Just about all of the fruit and vegetables donated were good quality. Every time someone brought in a donation they were entered in a drawing for a discount membership at the end of the season.

“I have sent a letter of thanks and appreciation to all who donated this season, along with a coupon for 50 percent off vegetable seeds and plants in 2006. It's hard to say whether the program impacted us with additional sales, but it did strengthen our community ties and everyone felt it was a great program. We even had fun working in our own company vegetable patch. For PAR in 2006, we plan on getting the local grade school involved with planting at our nursery and give them vegetable plants to take home to plant.”

Wow! Thanks to all who worked to make these incredible contributions to your communities. Plant a Row for the Hungry works because people care to share. For information about Plant a Row for the Hungry, a project of the Garden Writers Association, contact Elizabeth Petersen at gardenwrite@comcast.net or any of the individuals named in this summary.

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DiggerIn the next Digger:


Beautiful Blades: Ornamental grasses add form and color.

Find out what's new on the 2006 nursery trade show circuit.

Beat the odds with a succession strategy for your family business.






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